German Political and Civil Awards

German Political and Civil Awards
German Political and Civil Awards

After 1933, the Germany began issuing a variety of civilian decorations which could be bestowed upon any citizen of the Reich. Thus, some awards (such as Sports Badges) were bestowed on the Party members, members of the German military, and regular civilians. Many standard awards of the German state, such as military and civil service long service decorations and life-saving medals, were redesigned to incorporate the symbol, the swastika.

German military awards are by far the most commonly recognised. Military long service decorations, awards for participation in the Spanish Civil War and medals for the annexation of Austria and the Sudetenland were among early awards, but the greatest number began to be bestowed in 1939 after the start of World War II. Regulations of award issuance also permitted the simultaneous wear of military, civilian, and political decorations on any military or para-military uniform of Germany, allowing for a wide variety of combinations in manner of wear and awards displayed.

"The German Order"(German: Deutscher Orden) was the most important award that the N.S.D.A.P. Party could bestow on an individual for "duties of the highest order to the state and party" and designed by Benno von Arent. This award was first made by Adolf Hitler posthumously to Reichsminister Fritz Todt at his funeral in February 1942. A second posthumous award of the German Order was given to SS-Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich at his funeral in June that year.

Cynics called the award the "dead hero order" as it was almost always awarded posthumously. The only two persons who received the German Order who survived the war were Konstantin Hierl and Arthur Axmann.

The German Order was originally to be awarded in three grades, but only the neck order (the highest grade) was ever awarded. This award ranks the second rarest award in the Third Reich (second only to the National Prize for Art and Science). The holders of this award were supposed to form a confraternity.

Adolf Hitler viewed this award as his personal decoration to be bestowed only upon those whose services to the state and party he deemed worthy. For this reason, plus the fact that the reverse of the medal bears a facsimile of his signature, it was also informally known as the 'Hitler Order'.

There were in all eleven confirmed recipients of this award between 1942 and 1945. According to some documents, the order was going to be bestowed on Reichsführer SS Heinrich Himmler and Grand Admiral Karl Dönitz for their wartime service, but Germany surrendered before they could be awarded.

"Deutscher Orden"

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"Deutscher Orden"

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"Deutscher Orden - Streckkreuz"
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Reichskanzler Adolf Hitler

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"My Honour Is Called Loyalty" Medal

"Meine Ehre heißt Treue"

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Meinem Führer - "Unverbrüchliche Treue" Medal

 

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"Goldenes parteiabzeichen"
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"Parteiabzeichen"
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"Orden vom Deutsche Adler."

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"Goldenes H. J. Ehrenzeichen mit Eichenlaub"
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Olympiade 1936 Berlin Medal

 

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Cross of Honor of the German Mother Gold 1938.

"Ehremzeichen der Deutschen Mutter"
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Cross of Honor of the German Mother Silver 1938.

"Ehremzeichen der Deutschen Mutter"
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"Siegerabzeichen im Reichsberufswettkampf"

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"Siegerabzeichen im Reichsberufswettkampf"

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"Siegerabzeichen im Reichsberufswettkampf"

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"Blutorden"
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N.S.D.A.P. District Commemorative Badge

 Made 2 versions, "1923" and "1925" - this is version "1923"

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N.S.D.A.P. German Eagle Pin vers.

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"Deutsches Olympiaehrenzeichen."
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"Deutsche Adlerorder Mit Stern und Schwetern"

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"Deutsche Adlerorder Mit Stern und Schwetern"

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"Deutsche Adlerorder".

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